What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident?

A n optim­ist­ic indi­vidu­al like the Dalai lama would say the glob­al­ised era cre­ates an equal har­mo­ni­ous space for all cul­tures regard­less of their power dynam­ics. How­ever, the recent vir­al (edited) video of him flaunted Edward Said’s Oth­er­ness (west is nor­mal and rest is Oth­er) men­tal­ity is still deeply engrained in the minds of people from lar­ger coun­tries with colo­ni­al links.  To foster a gen­er­a­tion of stu­dents who can appre­ci­ate oth­er cul­tures, uni­ver­sit­ies offer a wide range of cul­tur­al cur­ricula.  Two con­cepts in cul­tur­al stud­ies are taught more rig­or­ously than the oth­ers: sub­jectiv­ity and pos­i­tion­al­ity.  This is to accen­tu­ate that people with dif­fer­ent sub­jectiv­it­ies and asso­ci­ated with dif­fer­ent pos­i­tion­ings com­pre­hend things dif­fer­ently. The Dalai Lama being an embod­i­ment of Tibetan cul­ture, one should at least offer him the com­mon cour­tesy of view­ing the non-edited video through the lens of Tibetan culture.

Up until the Chinese inva­sion in 1950, Tibet was a largely closed coun­try behind the Him­alay­as with many unique cul­tur­al stand­ards, some of which under­stand­ably look pecu­li­ar to people from oth­er coun­tries. That does not, how­ever, prove them wrong or inap­pro­pri­ate. The Tibetan cul­ture involving the tongue has a long his­tory. Tibetan folk­lore recounts that when the first king of Tibet, Nyatri Tsenpo (127 BC), came to Yarlung, the cradle of Tibetan civil­iz­a­tion, from Kongpo in the south, he met twelve yak her­ders. Since their region­al ver­nacu­lar was a bar­ri­er to com­mu­nic­a­tion Nyatri stuck out his tongue and touched his nose with it. The twelve her­ders said he must be spe­cial because being able to touch one’s nose with one’s own tongue is one of the thirty-two excel­lent signs of a Buddha. Con­sequently, they made him the first king of Tibet.

Per­haps since this very incid­ent and, in any case, since time imme­mori­al, stick­ing one’s tongue out is, in Tibetan cul­ture, a sign of greet­ing, respect, admit­ting mis­takes, and agree­ment. Gen­er­ally, when Tibetans meet, they quickly extend their tongues to show respect. This usu­ally hap­pens when a stu­dent meets a teach­er, or a com­mon­er meets a com­munity lead­er. Anoth­er legend speaks of how this is to show that they are not rein­carn­a­tions of the 42nd emper­or of Tibet called Lang Darma, who was reputed to have had a black tongue – like an ox — and was known for his cruelty towards Buddhists.

In gen­er­al, Tibetans do not view the tongue either as unhygien­ic or as an ero­gen­ous zone. Indeed, it is con­sidered extremely impol­ite to leave one’s bowl unlicked after a meal. For this reas­on, chil­dren are taught how to lick their bowls as an act of good man­ners when invited to meals by oth­er fam­il­ies. Sim­il­arly, pre­mas­tic­a­tion is still the stand­ard way of wean­ing babies in Tibet. Moth­er and grand­moth­er are the most com­mon people to wean the baby with their tongue, passing food dir­ectly from mouth to mouth, but it is not exclus­ive to them as one can see fath­er, uncle, grand­fath­er, and oth­er fam­ily mem­bers also doing the job. Sim­il­arly, it is com­mon to share a half-fin­ished candy from one’s mouth with grand­chil­dren. Grand­par­ents often being the treas­ury of can­dies, chil­dren habitu­ally gath­er around them, beg­ging for sweets. Some­times they get a new one, wrapped in fresh paper. Oth­er times they will get a half-eaten candy from their grand­par­ents’ mouth. Either way, it is invari­ably a most joy­ful gift. In poor, rur­al, Tibetan house­holds, such as the one I grew up in, sweets are almost as rare as gold itself.

There are occa­sions when chil­dren, greedy for more, are scared off by their grand­par­ents when they ask for more. This is done by the adult show­ing their tongue and say­ing da gni je leb zoe (ད་ངའི་ལྕེ་ལེབ་ཟོས།) ‘now eat my tongue’ – this in the sense of ‘I’ve got noth­ing left: if you want more, you’ll have to eat my tongue.’ As such, it is a com­mon phrase used to reject chil­dren ask­ing for gifts  twice. The Dalai Lama, an 87-year-old Tibetan, just mis­takenly trans­lated this cen­tur­ies old Tibetan phrase into Eng­lish and said “now suck my tongue”.  Any­one not fully bilin­gual will have exper­i­ence of mak­ing com­mon mis­takes like this, let alone an 87-year-old, who nev­er learned Eng­lish form­ally.  The most unfor­tu­nate mis­un­der­stand­ing was that the boy, being an Indi­an, did not have a clue about that the Dalai Lama was, in effect, telling him not to be greedy. Hence, he approaches to touch Dalai Lama’s tongue, but the Dalai Lama gives him a small nudge with laughter. You can see this if you watch the  non-edited video. The actu­al tongue touch­ing does not hap­pen and, in fact, Tibetans don’t suck each other’s tongues at all.  “Now eat my tongue” is simply a phrase we use to tease extra needy chil­dren as a way to tell them to ‘clear off, you’ve had enough already’.

Finally, it is import­ant for one to know how the phrase “suck my tongue” trans­lates into a Tibetan mind. The Tibetan phrase is either ngi je leb jip (ངའི་ལྕེ་ལེབ་འཇིབ) or ngi je leb nu (ངའི་ལྕེ་ལེབ་ནུ།). Not only do neither of these phrases have any sexu­al con­nota­tions, but also, they are not com­monly used phrases.  Da gni je leb zoe (ད་ངའི་ལྕེ་ལེབ་ཟོས།) (now eat my tongue), on the oth­er hand, is a com­mon phrase, but no one takes it lit­er­ally like the Indi­an boy did. An equi­val­ent phrase one can find in Amer­ic­an Eng­lish is “eat my shorts”. 

Ju Tenzin Choephel

Ju Tenzin Choephel 

Author

Ten­zin is a MPhil gradu­ate in Tibetan and Him­alay­an Stud­ies from the Uni­ver­sity of Oxford. He is also the founder of Loplao and co-founder of Tib Shelf. He has authored a Tibetan lan­guage text­book called The Manu­al of Authen­t­ic Tibetan. He is cur­rently study­ing geo­graphy at the Uni­vesity of Edinburgh. 

 

Selling Pork

ཕག་ཤ་འཚོང་བ།

Porky Business

Abstract

The King replied, “Well then, bring me the meat broth!” Nichö Zangpo replied, “We have already drunk the meat broth accord­ing to the King’s instruc­tions.” The King had no option but to eat that pig’s cooked hide.

.

ཕག་ཤ་འཚོང་བ། (བོད་ཡིག)

by ལྷག་པ་བདེ་སྐྱིད།

Vocabulary (མིང་ཚིག)

 

སྣེ་གདོང་།

Nay­dong, a place in South­ern Tibet

ནད་ཕོག to be struck down by ill­ness eg. swine flu
ཁུ་བ། broth
སྟི་ག  tiny pieces
ཕག་ཀོ pig’s hide
ལྔུར་བ། to become soft
བཞུར།to melt
མི་ཟ་ཀ་མེད་བྱུང་།no option but to eat
རྒྱུག་རྡུང་། cor­por­al punishment

 

Download the translation

View source text

Once day, after secretly killing the fat­test pig belong­ing to King of Nay­dong, Nichö Zangpo came before the king and asked, “Your Majesty, the fat­test of all your pigs was struck down with an ill­ness and has died. Now, where should I throw the corpse?” The king answered, “After shav­ing the hair cleanly, go and sell the meat at the mar­ket. You should present the pro­ceeds without tak­ing a cut.”  Then, in accord­ance with the instruc­tions of the king, Nichö Zangpo took the load of pork to the mar­ket. “Any buy­ers for pork from a pig struck down by ill­ness?” Although he spent all day shout­ing, he was unable to sell even one tiny piece of meat.

 Then, Nichö Zangpo brought the pork back and explained in detail to the king how there were no buy­ers and so the King said, “now it is ok If you cook the meat and eat it.” Nichö Zangpo asked, “Your Majesty, will you par­take of the meat or the broth?” The King replied, “I am the King, so of course I will eat the meat. Since you are all ser­vants, unworthy oth­er than to drink the meat broth, why do you even need to ask?” thus he rep­rim­anded him.

 Then, Nichö Zangpo chopped the meat and bones up into tiny pieces and, since he cooked it for a very long time, hav­ing fallen away from the bones, the meat became soft and mushy, and noth­ing but the bones and hide could be retrieved. Nichö Zangpo and the ser­vants drank the fla­vour­some and nutri­tious meat broth and offered the pig’s hide and bones to the king, “Your Majesty, “except for the pig’s hide and bones, all the meat has liquified and melted into meat broth. Please par­take of this cooked hide.”He said.

The King replied, “Well then, bring me the meat broth!” Nichö Zangpo replied, “We have already drunk the meat broth accord­ing to the King’s instruc­tions.” The King had no option but to eat that pig’s cooked hide.

 The next time they were eat­ing pork, the King first said to Nichö Zangpo, “This time, I’ll drink the meat broth! You all can eat the meat.” Then, Nichö Zangpo took the boiled meat out as soon as it was cooked, divided it up for every­body and it was eaten. The meat broth, which was devoid of any meaty fla­vour, was offered to the King.

 

Pro­verb: From time spent with the excel­lent come tea and alcohol;

                    From time spent with the evil comes cor­por­al punishment!

 

ཉིན་ཞིག་ལ།  ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་སྣེ་གདོང་རྒྱལ་པོའི་ཕག་པ་རྒྱགས་ཤོས་དེ་ལྐོག་ཏུ་བསད་རྗེས།  རྒྱལ་པོའི་དྲུང་དུ་སོང་ནས།  རྒྱལ་པོ་ལགས།  ཁྱེད་ཚང་གི་ཕག་པ་རྒྱགས་ཤོས་དེར་ནད་ཕོག་སྟེ་ཤི་འདུག  ད་རོ་གང་དུ་གཡུག་དགོས་ཞེས་ཞུས་པར།  རྒྱལ་པོས་ སྤུ་གཙང་མ་བཞར་ནས་ཤ་ཁྲོམ་ལ་འཚོང་དུ་སོང་། རིན་པ་ཆད་ལུས་མེད་པར་རྩིས་འབུལ་ཞུ་དགོས།ཞེས་བཤད།  དེ་ནས་ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་རྒྱལ་པོའི་བཀའ་བཞིན་ཕག་ཤ་ཁུར་ནས་ཁྲོམ་ལ་སོང་སྟེ།   ཕག་ནད་ཕོག་པའི་ཕག་ཤ་ཉོ་མཁན་ཨེ་ཡོད།ཞེས་འབོད་བཞིན་ཉིན་གང་ལ་བསྡད་ཀྱང་།  ཤ་སྟི་ག་གཅིག་ཀྱང་བཙོང་མ་ཐུབ་པ་རེད།

དེ་ནས་ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་ཕག་ཤ་ཁུར་ཡོང་ནས་ཉོ་མཁན་མེད་ལུགས་རྒྱལ་པོར་ཞིབ་ཕྲ་ཞུས་པས།  རྒྱལ་པོས་ “ད་ཤ་བཙོས་ཏེ་ཟོས་ན་འགྲིག ཅེས་ཟེར་བར།  ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས།  རྒྱལ་པོ་ལགས།  ཁྱེད་ཀྱིས་ཤ་བཞེས་སམ།  ཡང་ན་ཁུ་བ་བཞེས་ཞེས་ཞུས་པ་དང་།  རྒྱལ་པོས་ང་ནི་རྒྱལ་པོ་ཡིན་པས་ཤ་བཟའ་བ་ཡིན།  ཁྱོད་ཚོ་འཁོར་གཡོག་རྣམས་ཀྱིས་ཤ་ཁུ་འཐུང་བ་ལས་འོས་མེད་པས།  ད་དུང་འདྲི་དགོས་དོན་ཅི་ཡོད་ ཅེས་གཤེ་གཤེ་བཏང་།

དེ་ནས་ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་ཤ་དང་རུས་པ་ཞིབ་མོར་གཏུབས་ཏེ་ཡུན་རིང་བཙོས་པས།  ཤ་ལྡུར་ཞིང་ནུར་ནས་ཀོ་བ་དང་རུས་པ་ཙམ་ལས་ལེན་རྒྱུ་མེད་པར་གྱུར།  ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོ་དང་གཡོག་པོ་རྣམས་ཀྱིས་རོ་བཅུད་ལྡན་པའི་ཤ་ཁུ་འཐུང་བ་དང་།  རྒྱལ་པོར་ཕག་ཀོ་དང་རུས་པ་ཕུལ་ནས།  རྒྱལ་པོ་ལགས།  ཕག་ཀོ་དང་རུས་པ་ཙམ་མ་གཏོགས་ཤ་ཚང་མ་ནུར་ནས་ཤ་ཁུའི་ནང་དུ་བཞུར་འདུག བཙོས་མ་འདི་བཞེས་རོགས་གནང་།ཞེས་ཞུས་པས།  རྒྱལ་པོས་འོ་ན་ཤ་ཁུ་ཁྱེར་ཤོག ཅེས་ཟེར་བར།  ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་ ཤ་ཁུ་ང་ཚོས་རྒྱལ་པོའི་བཀའ་བཞིན་བཏུང་ནས་ཚར་སོང་། ཞེས་ཞུས་པས།  རྒྱལ་པོ་ཅི་བྱ་མེད་པར་གྱུར་ནས་ཕག་ཀོ་བཙོས་མ་དེ་མི་ཟ་ཀ་མེད་བྱུང་། 

ཐེངས་རྗེས་མར།  ཕག་ཤ་ཟ་སྐབས།  རྒྱལ་པོས་ཐོག་མ་ནས་ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོར་“དེ་རེས་ངས་ཤ་ཁུ་འཐུང་ཆོག   ཁྱེད་ཚོས་ཤ་ཟོ་ཞིག ཅེས་བཤད།  དེ་ནས་ཉི་ཆོས་བཟང་པོས་ཤ་ཚོས་མ་ཐག་ཏུ་ཡར་བཏོན་ནས་ཚང་མར་བགོས་ཏེ་ཟོས་པ་དང་།   རྒྱལ་པོར་ཤའི་བྲོ་བ་ཙམ་ཡང་མེད་པའི་ཤ་ཁུ་དེ་ཕུལ་བ་རེད།

གཏམ་དཔེ།

          བཟང་པོའི་ཞོར་ལ་ཇ་ཆང་དང་།

           ངན་པའི་ཞོར་ལ་རྒྱུག་རྡུང་། །

Loplao's Student Translation Group One

Loplao’s Student Translation Group One 

Trans­lat­ors

 This is trans­lated by Loplao’s first group of trans­la­tion students.

 

Your Title Goes Here

Your con­tent goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the mod­ule Con­tent set­tings. You can also style every aspect of this con­tent in the mod­ule Design set­tings and even apply cus­tom CSS to this text in the mod­ule Advanced settings.

Submit your own translation

Related posts

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident?

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident? 

A n optim­ist­ic indi­vidu­al like the Dalai lama would say the glob­al­ised era cre­ates an equal har­mo­ni­ous space for all cul­tures regard­less of their power dynam­ics. How­ever, the recent vir­al (edited) video of him flaunted Edward Said’s Oth­er­ness (west is nor­mal and rest…

read more
Selling Pork

Selling Pork 

Once day, after secretly killing the fat­test pig belong­ing to King of Nay­dong, Nichö Zangpo came

read more
The Cat Master

The Cat Master 

After hav­ing fooled some pigeons, the deceit­ful cat ate them. Since pigeons no longer ven­tured around him, 

read more
Tibet’s Hero

Tibet’s Hero 

Tibet is a land of her­oes and heroines. This story depicts the unwaver­ing mar­tyr­dom of a true 

read more

Get in touch and join our Mailing List!

New Field

Sunday Pondering

གཟ་ཉི་མའི་བསམ་གཞིག

A Sunday Pondering

 

Abstract

At that time, Gen Wangmo asked an Indi­an acquaint­ance for inform­a­tion. The extremely joy­ous Indi­an excitedly replied, “Not only have we Indi­ans suc­cess­fully send a satel­lite to the moon, but we’re also the first to announce to the world the news of the exist­ence of water on the Moon. Just look! If we’re not joy­ful at this news, what can we be joy­ful about?” And he showed us the news being broad­cast on television.

གཟའ་ཉི་མའི་བསམ་གཞིག

by ལྷག་པ་བདེ་སྐྱིད།

Vocabulary (མིང་ཚིག)

 

ལྒང་བུ།

bal­loon      

ལ་ཁའི་ཉི་མ།

set­ting sun
རླངས་འཁོར་གྱི་འགྲུལ་སྐྱོད།traffic
འཇམ་ཐིང་ངེ་།tran­quil 
ཀི་ལྡིར་བྱེད།shrill shout­ing

ཚིམས་པ།

to sat­is­fy

གནས་ཚུལ།inform­a­tion
སྲུང་སྐར།satel­lite
གཟའ་སྐར།plan­et 

 

Download the translation

View source text

Yes­ter­day, my teach­er Wangmo and I went for a walk beside the bridge to the right of the school. Resem­bling a golden-col­oured bal­loon, the set­ting sun was about to dis­ap­pear behind the shoulder of the west­ern moun­tain. The fact that the entire envir­on­ment breathed a tran­quil­lity akin to that of nomad­ic grass­lands was due to it being a Sunday, a hol­i­day, as well as the traffic being extremely light.

  Inside the tea house loc­ated to the right of the school there were many Indi­ans, young and old who were engaged in wel­come applause and shrill exclam­a­tions whilst watch­ing tele­vi­sion. It was highly likely that a tre­mend­ously sat­is­fy­ing event had occurred.

 At that time, Gen Wangmo asked an Indi­an acquaint­ance for inform­a­tion. The extremely joy­ous Indi­an excitedly replied, “Not only have we Indi­ans suc­cess­fully send a satel­lite to the moon, but we’re also the first to announce to the world the news of the exist­ence of water on the Moon. Just look! If we’re not joy­ful at this news, what can we be joy­ful about?” And he showed us the news being broad­cast on television.

How­ever, Gen Wangmo’s face did not express the same joy­ful­ness as those Indi­ans When I imme­di­ately asked her why, Gen Wangmo said, “The fact that we are able to travel to oth­er plan­ets in depend­ence upon human intel­li­gence makes me happy. Moreover, it is our hosts, the Indi­ans who have achieved this. How­ever, the astro­nauts are not Tibetan. One day, if there comes a time where we are also able to send a satel­lite to oth­er plan­ets like that, I will prob­ably be jump­ing for joy.”

 When I returned to my bed­room, I reflec­ted on Gen Wangmo’s words. We ourselves do not even pos­sess a piece of land the size of a palm of the hand whilst also hav­ing to live on land belong­ing to oth­ers. I also real­ised that from the point of view of mod­ern sci­entif­ic devel­op­ment, we were underdeveloped.

If I wanted to see a truly smil­ing expres­sion on Gen Wangmo’s face, I knew I needed to achieve out­stand­ing res­ults through study­ing the tra­di­tion­al and mod­ern sub­jects comprehensively.

ཁ་སང་ང་དང་དགེ་རྒན་དབང་མོ་གཉིས་སློབ་གྲྭའི་གཡས་ཟུར་གྱི་ཟམ་པའི་ཁར་འཆམ་འཆམ་དུ་བསྐྱོད།   ལ་ཁའི་ཉི་མ་ནི་གསེར་མདོག་གི་ལྒང་བུ་ཞིག་དང་འདྲ་བར་ནུབ་རིའི་ཕྲག་ཏུ་ཡིབ་ལ་ཉེ།   ཁོར་ཡུག་ཡོངས་སུ་འབྲོག་པའི་རྩྭ་ཐང་བཞིན་འཇམ་ཐིང་ངེར་ཡོད་པ་དེ་ནི།   གཟའ་ཉི་མ་གུང་གསེང་ཡིན་པ་དང་།   རླངས་འཁོར་གྱི་འགྲུལ་སྐྱོད་ཧ་ཅང་ཉུང་བས་རེད། 

 སློབ་གྲྭའི་གཡས་ཟུར་གྱི་ཇ་ཁང་ནང་།   རྒྱ་གར་བ་རྒན་གཞོན་མང་པོ་ཞིག་གིས་བརྙན་འཕྲིན་ལ་ལྟ་བཞིན་དགའ་བསུའི་ཐལ་མོ་རྡེབ་པ་དང་།   ཀི་ལྡིར་བྱེད་པ།   གནམ་ལ་མཆོངས་པ་སོགས་ལ་བལྟས་ན།   ཁོང་ཚོར་ཧ་ཅང་ཡིད་ཚིམས་པའི་དོན་དག་ཅིག་བྱུང་ཡོད་ཤས་ཆེ།  

སྐབས་དེར།   རྒན་དབང་མོས་ངོ་ཤེས་རྒྱ་གར་བ་ཞིག་ལ་གནས་ཚུལ་དྲིས།   རྒྱ་གར་བ་དེས་ཤིན་ཏུ་སྤྲོ་བའི་ཉམས་དང་བཅས།   “ང་ཚོ་རྒྱ་གར་གྱིས་ཟླ་བའི་ཐོག་ལ་མིས་བཟོས་སྲུང་སྐར་ཞིག་བཏང་བ་དེ་ལེགས་འགྲུབ་བྱུང་བ་མ་ཟད།   ཟླ་བའི་གོ་ལའི་སྟེང་ཆུ་ཡོད་པའི་གསལ་བསྒྲགས་ཐོག་མ་དེའང་།  འཛམ་གླིང་ལ་བསྒྲགས་པ་རེད།   ཁྱེད་ཀྱིས་ལྟོས་དང་།   ང་ཚོ་གནས་ཚུལ་འདི་ལ་མི་དགའ་ན་གང་ལ་དགའ།”  ཞེས་བརྙན་འཕྲིན་ནང་གི་གསར་འགྱུར་དེ་མིག་སྟོན་བྱས་སོང་།  

 ཡིན་ནའང་།   རྒན་དབང་མོའི་ངོ་གདོང་ན།   རྒྱ་གར་བ་དེ་ཚོ་དང་འདྲ་བའི་དགའ་ཚོར་ཞིག་མི་འདུག   ངས་ལམ་སང་རྒན་དབང་མོར་བཀའ་འདྲི་ཞུས་པ་ན།   རྒན་དབང་མོས་ “ང་རང་དགའ་སྤྲོ་སྐྱེས་བྱུང་།   མིའི་རྣམ་དཔྱོད་ལ་བརྟེན་ནས་གཟའ་སྐར་གཞན་ལ་སྐོར་བསྐྱོད་བྱེད་ཐུབ་ཀྱི་ཡོད་པ་རེད།   དེ་ལྟར་བྱེད་མཁན་ཡང་གནས་བདག་རྒྱ་གར་བ་རེད།   ཡིན་ནའང་།   འཕུར་གྲུ་གཏོང་མཁན་དེ་ང་ཚོ་མ་རེད།   ནམ་ཞིག་ང་ཚོས་ཀྱང་དེ་ལྟར་གཟའ་སྐར་གཞན་གྱི་ཐོག་མིས་བཟོས་སྲུང་སྐར་གཏོང་ཐུབ་པའི་དུས་ཤིག་བྱུང་ཚེ། ང་རང་དགའ་ནས་གནམ་ལ་མཆོངས་ས་རེད།” ཟེར།

 ཕྱིར་ཉལ་ཁང་དུ་ལོག་ནས།   ངས་རྒན་དབང་མོའི་སྐད་ཆ་དེར་བསམ་བློ་ཞིག་གཏོང་དུས།   ང་ཚོར་རང་ས་ལག་མཐིང་ཙམ་མེད་པར་གཞན་གྱི་ལུང་པར་བསྡད་ཡོད་པ་དང་།   དེང་རབས་རིག་གནས་ཐད་ནས་རྗེས་ལུས་ཡིན་པ་དེ་ཡང་ཚོར་སོང་།   རྒན་དབང་མོའི་གདོང་གི་འཛུམ་མདངས་ངོ་མ་དེ་མཐོང་དགོས་ན།   གནའ་དེང་གི་ཤེས་ཡོན་ལ་སློབ་སྦྱོང་བྱས་ཏེ་གྲུབ་འབྲས་གཟེངས་སུ་ཐོན་པ་ཞིག་བྱེད་དགོས་པའང་གཞི་ནས་ཤེས། །

Loplao's Student Translation Group One

Loplao’s Student Translation Group One 

Trans­lat­ors

 This is trans­lated by Loplao’s first group of trans­la­tion students.

 

Your Title Goes Here

Your con­tent goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the mod­ule Con­tent set­tings. You can also style every aspect of this con­tent in the mod­ule Design set­tings and even apply cus­tom CSS to this text in the mod­ule Advanced settings.

Submit your own translation

Related posts

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident?

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident? 

A n optim­ist­ic indi­vidu­al like the Dalai lama would say the glob­al­ised era cre­ates an equal har­mo­ni­ous space for all cul­tures regard­less of their power dynam­ics. How­ever, the recent vir­al (edited) video of him flaunted Edward Said’s Oth­er­ness (west is nor­mal and rest…

read more
Selling Pork

Selling Pork 

Once day, after secretly killing the fat­test pig belong­ing to King of Nay­dong, Nichö Zangpo came

read more
The Cat Master

The Cat Master 

After hav­ing fooled some pigeons, the deceit­ful cat ate them. Since pigeons no longer ven­tured around him, 

read more
Tibet’s Hero

Tibet’s Hero 

Tibet is a land of her­oes and heroines. This story depicts the unwaver­ing mar­tyr­dom of a true 

read more

Get in touch and join our Mailing List!

New Field

Nomad Jargon 

འབྲོག་པའི་ཐ་སྙད། 

Nomad Jargon

 

Abstract

 These are: poles, guy ropes, black yak-hair tent,

Dowa, gyemo, kyelpa, gye’u;  (Large and medi­um-sized leath­er bags and small bags)

Saddle, bridle and bit, har­ness, seat and stirrups,

Nose ring and rope, stake and tether;

Sling-shot, milk­ing buck­et and lasso.

འབྲོག་པའི་ཐ་སྙད།

by Ten­zin Choephel 

Vocabulary (མིང་ཚིག)

 

འདོ་བ།hon­or­if­ic or affec­tion­ate name for horse
ནག་ཆུང་།affec­tion­ate name for yak and oth­er dark-haired domest­ic animals
ནོར། yaks and oth­er dark-haired domest­ic animals
ཕྱུགས་ལས། pas­tor­al or farm­ing work
ཡོ་ཆས། tools

 

Download the translation

View source text

Pastoral Work 

 Depend­ing upon the grass, water,and the temperature,

[Pas­tor­al work] involves chan­ging the loc­a­tion of the tents,

From Spring to Sum­mer to Autumn to Winter pastures,

Keep­ing the cattle in neatly fenced enclosures.

 Types of Cattle

 Horses have manes, tails and coats of vari­ous colours.

Cattle pos­sess four types of hair: long coarse hair, short soft hair,

   Tail and mane.

The snow-white sheep pro­duce hair and wool,

And domest­ic goats have long coarse hair and short soft hair.

 Tools of the Trade

 These are: poles, guy ropes, black yak-hair tent,

Dowa, gyemo, kyelpa, gye’u;  (Large and medi­um-sized leath­er bags and small bags)

Saddle, bridle and bit, har­ness, seat and stirrups,

Nose ring and rope, stake and tether;

Sling-shot, milk­ing buck­et and lasso.

Types of Produce

Deli­cious but­ter, cheese, roas­ted bar­ley flour, dump­lings and yoghurt,

Sweet cheese, wild sweet pota­toes, meat and vegetables.

ཕྱུགས་ལས།

རྩྭ་ཆུ་དྲོད་གྲང་ལ་བརྟེན་ནས། །

དཔྱིད་ས་དབྱར་ས་སྟོན་ས་དང་། །

དགུན་ས་སོགས་ལ་རུ་སྤོ་དང་། །

མཚེས་ལྷས་སོགས་ལ་ཕྱུགས་རྣམས་བསྐྱིལ། །

 ཕྱུགས་རིགས།

འདོ་བ་རྟ་ལ་རྔ་རྔོག་དང་། །

རྟ་སྤུ་ཚོན་མདོན་འདྲ་མིན་ཡོད། །

ནག་ཆུང་ནོར་ལ་ཁུལ་རྩི་དང་། །

རྔ་མ་ཟེ་བ་བཞི་རུ་དབྱེ། །

གཡང་དཀར་ལུག་ལ་བལ་དང་གྲ །

ཚེ་ཚེ་ར་ལ་ཁུལ་རྩིད་ཡོད། 

 ཡོ་ཆས།

ཀ་ར་ཆོན་ཐག་རེ་ལྡེ་སྦྲ ། 

སྒྲོ་བ་སྒྱེ་མོ་རྐྱལ་པ་སྒྱེའུ། 

སྒ་སྲབ་མཐུར་རྨེད་ཡོབ་ཆེན་དང་། །

སྣ་གཅུ་སྣ་ཐིག་ཕུར་བ་རྡང་། 

འུར་རྡོ་འོ་ཟོ་ཞགས་པ་ཡོད། 

ཟས་རིགས།

མར་ཆུར་རྩམ་པ་མོག་མོག་ཞོ། 

ཆུར་ཐུད་གྲོ་མ་ཤ་ཚལ་ཞིམ། 

Loplao's Student Translation Group One

Loplao’s Student Translation Group One 

Trans­lat­ors

 This is trans­lated by Loplao’s first group of trans­la­tion students.

 

Your Title Goes Here

Your con­tent goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the mod­ule Con­tent set­tings. You can also style every aspect of this con­tent in the mod­ule Design set­tings and even apply cus­tom CSS to this text in the mod­ule Advanced settings.

Submit your own translation

Related posts

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident?

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident? 

A n optim­ist­ic indi­vidu­al like the Dalai lama would say the glob­al­ised era cre­ates an equal har­mo­ni­ous space for all cul­tures regard­less of their power dynam­ics. How­ever, the recent vir­al (edited) video of him flaunted Edward Said’s Oth­er­ness (west is nor­mal and rest…

read more
Selling Pork

Selling Pork 

Once day, after secretly killing the fat­test pig belong­ing to King of Nay­dong, Nichö Zangpo came

read more
The Cat Master

The Cat Master 

After hav­ing fooled some pigeons, the deceit­ful cat ate them. Since pigeons no longer ven­tured around him, 

read more
Tibet’s Hero

Tibet’s Hero 

Tibet is a land of her­oes and heroines. This story depicts the unwaver­ing mar­tyr­dom of a true 

read more

Get in touch and join our Mailing List!

New Field

The Cat Master

 སློབ་དཔོན་བྱི་ལ།

 The Cat Master

Abstract

The mice believed what the cat said and every even­ing they gathered to receive his Dharma teach­ings. Once the teach­ing was fin­ished, while the mice were return­ing home, the cat caught whichever was the last one to leave and ate it.

.

Vocabulary (མིང་ཚིག)

 

བྱི་ལ།cat
བྱི་བ། mouse
མགོ་བསྐོར།to deceive
ཕྲེང་བ།   mala, pray­er beads
དགེ་བསྙེན་གྱི་སྡོམ་པ།upa­saka vows (5 lay vows includ­ing abandon­ing killing)
བྲུན།bird’s excre­ment
ཧོན་འཐོར། to be shocked
དྲིལ་ཆུང་།small bell
ངག་འཇམ་པོའི་ངང་།talk with melodi­ous voice 

 

Download the translation

View source text

As the Cat Mas­ter became fat­ter and fatter,

His ret­in­ue of mice became smal­ler and smaller:

If it’s grain that he’s eating,

 Where did the furry cat fae­ces come from? 

After hav­ing fooled some pigeons, the deceit­ful cat ate them. Since pigeons no longer ven­tured around him,  he was unable to get hold of even one of them.

He made a liv­ing by steal­ing all the pos­ses­sions of a Gelong one by one, and selling them at the mar­ket. One day, while he was steal­ing the Gelong’s mala, the monk saw him. Due to the Gelong reach­ing with one hand after the cat and strongly pulling his tail, the cat’s tail broke off into his hand and the cat escaped.

  In addi­tion to being an aged cat, he had also lost his tail and so his dex­ter­ity dimin­ished. He con­sequently became help­less and ema­ci­ated due to hun­ger from not being able to catch any mice. 

While adorned with the Gelong’s mala around his neck, the cat addressed some mice in the fol­low­ing way, “All of you!  Don’t be afraid of me.  Although in the past I per­formed quite a lot of wrong deeds, now, how­ever while in the pres­ence of the Gelong, I received Upa­saka vows. Not only am I keep­ing the five basic train­ings, in addi­tion, I have also aban­doned eat­ing red foods (meat). Now, I can teach you all the Dharma.” Thus, he pre­ten­ded to give a Dharma talk with a soft melodi­ous voice.

The mice believed what the cat said and every even­ing they gathered to receive his Dharma teach­ings. Once the teach­ing was fin­ished, while the mice were return­ing home, the cat caught whichever was the last one to leave and ate it. 

Due to this situ­ation, as the cat gradu­ally became fat­ter and fat­ter the num­ber of mice became few­er and few­er. Uncom­fort­able with this, the mice had a meet­ing dur­ing which the chief mouse, by the name of Raphen, examined the cat’s excre­ment and saw that there was mouse bone and fur, hence he knew that the cat was telling lies. How­ever, he pre­ten­ded not to know and addressed the cat, “Dear Pre­cious Teach­er, what kind of food do you eat?” “I don’t eat any­thing but a little grain and leaves”, the cat replied.

 Then, Raphen related the sequence of events to the mice and every­one was very shocked and sur­prised. “So, what do we need to do now?” the mice said.  Raphen replied, “I have a plan”, and he told them about it.  The fol­low­ing day, dur­ing the Dharma teach­ing, the mice offered a small bell by way of a gift to the Cat Mas­ter and it was fastened around his neck. While return­ing home after the Dharma teach­ing was over, every­one looked back at the same time since the ringing bell resoun­ded loudly for all to hear. The catch­ing and killing of one mouse by the cat was mani­fest for all to see. Since that time, cats always bury their excre­ment under the earth. 

 

སློབ་དཔོན་བྱི་ལ་ཇེ་རྒྱགས་དང་། །

བྱི་བའི་འཁོར་ཚོགས་ཇེ་ཉུང་རེད། 

ཟས་སུ་ལོ་འབྲས་གསོལ་བ་ལ། 

རིལ་མ་སྤུ་ཅན་ག་ནས་བྱུང་། 

བྱི་ལ་ཟོག་པོ་དེས་འང་གུ་རྣམས་མགོ་བསྐོར་ནས་བཟས་པའི་རྗེས།  འང་གུ་རྣམས་ཁོའི་ཕྱོགས་ཉེ་སར་མ་སོང་བས་འང་གུ་གཅིག་ཀྱང་འཛིན་མ་ཐུབ།  ཁོས་དགེ་སློང་གི་ཅ་དངོས་རེ་རེ་བཞིན་བརྐུས་ནས་དེ་ཁྲོམ་དུ་བཙོངས་ནས་འཚོ་བ་བསྐྱལ། ཉིན་ཞིག   ཁོས་དགེ་སློང་གི་ཕྲེང་བ་རྐུ་སྐབས།   དགེ་སློང་གིས་མཐོང་།   དགེ་སློང་གིས་བྱི་ལའི་རྗེས་སུ་ལག་སྙོབ་ཅིག་བྱས་པས།   མཇུག་མ་ལག་ཏུ་ཐེབས་ནས་ཤུགས་ཀྱིས་འཐེན་པ་ན།   མཇུག་མ་ཆད་དེ་བྱི་ལ་ཤོར་བ་རེད།     

 བྱི་ལ་ན་སོ་རྒན་པའི་ཁར་མཇུག་མ་ཡང་ཆད་ནས་རྩལ་ཆུང་དུ་སོང་བས།   བྱི་བ་ཟིན་མ་ཐུབ་པར་གྲོད་ཁོག་ལྟོགས་ནས་གཟུགས་པོ་སྐམ་ཞིང་ཉམ་ཐག་པར་གྱུར།  བྱི་ལས་དགེ་སློང་གི་ཕྲེང་བ་སྐེ་ལ་གྱོན་ནས་བྱི་བ་རྣམས་ལ་འདི་ལྟར་བཤད།   “ཁྱེད་རྣམས་ང་ལ་སྐྲག་མི་དགོས།   ངས་དེ་སྔོན་བྱ་སྤྱོད་མི་ལེགས་པ་གང་མང་བྱས་པ་ཡིན་ཡང་།   ད་ནི་དགེ་སློང་གི་དྲུང་ནས་དགེ་བསྙེན་གྱི་སྡོམ་པ་ཞུས་ཏེ་བསླབ་བའི་གཞི་ལྔ་བསྲུངས་པས་མ་ཚད།   དམར་ཟས་ཀྱང་སྤངས་ཚར།  ད་ཁྱེད་རྣམས་ལ་ངས་ཆོས་བཤད་ཆོག”   ཅེས་སྐད་ངག་འཇམ་པོའི་ངང་ཆོས་བཤད་ཁུལ་བྱས། 

 བྱི་བ་ཚོས་སྐད་ཆ་དེ་བདེན་པར་བསམས་ཏེ།   ཉིན་ལྟར་དགོང་དྲོའི་དུས་ཆོས་ཞུ་བར་བཅར་བ་རེད།   ཆོས་བཤད་ཟིན་ནས་བྱི་བ་རྣམས་ནང་ལ་ལོག་འགྲོ་སྐབས།   ཕྱི་མ་གང་ཡིན་པ་དེ་བཟུང་ནས་བཟས།   དེ་ལྟར་བྱས་པས་རིམ་གྱིས་བྱི་ལ་རྒྱགས་པ་ཆགས་པ་དང་།   བྱི་བའི་གྲངས་ཀ་ཉུང་ནས་ཉུང་དུ་སོང་བ་ན།   བྱི་བ་རྣམས་བློ་མ་བདེ་བར་གྲོས་བསྡུར་བྱས་པར།   བྱི་བའི་མགོ་དཔོན་ར་འཕན་བྱ་བ་གཅིག་ཡོད་པ་དེས་བྱི་ལའི་བྲུན་ལ་བརྟགས་པར།    བྱི་བའི་སྤུ་དང་རུས་པ་ཡོད་པར་མཐོང་བས།    བྱི་ལས་རྫུན་བཤད་པར་ཤེས་ཀྱང་མ་ཤེས་ཁུལ་བྱས་ནས།    “ཀྱེ།  སློབ་དཔོན་རིན་པོ་ཆེ།   ཁྱེད་ཀྱིས་ཟས་སུ་ཅི་གསོལ་བ་ལགས་”ཞུས་པས།   “བདག་གིས་ལོ་མ་དང་འབྲས་བུ་ཅུང་ཟད་ལས་བཟའ་ཡི་མེད། ” ཅེས་བཤད།  

 དེ་ནས་ར་འཕན་གྱིས་བྱི་བ་རྣམས་ལ་ལོ་རྒྱུས་རྣམས་བཤད་པར།   ཐམས་ཅད་ཧ་ལས་ཤིང་ཧོན་འཐོར་ནས།   ད་ནི་ཅི་ཞིག་བྱ་དགོས་སམ་ཟེར་བར།  ར་འཕན་ན་རེད།  ང་ལ་ཐབས་ཤིག་ཡོད་ཟེར་ནས་ཁོང་ཚོར་བསླབས།   ཕྱི་ཉིན་ཆོས་ཞུ་སྐབས།   བྱི་བ་རྣམས་ཀྱིས་སློབ་དཔོན་བྱི་ལར་ལེགས་སྐྱེས་ཀྱི་ཚུལ་དུ་དྲིལ་ཆུང་ཞིག་ཕུལ་ཏེ་སྐེ་ལ་བཏགས་པ་རེད།   དེར་གསུང་ཆོས་ཟིན་ནས་ནང་དུ་ལོག་སྐབས་དྲིལ་སྒྲ་དྲག་ཏུ་གྲགས་པ་ཐོས་པས།   ཚང་མས་དུས་གཅིག་ཏུ་ཕྱིར་བལྟ་བྱས་པར།   །བྱི་ལས་བྱི་བ་གཅིག་བཟུང་ནས་གསོད་པར་མཐོང་།   དུས་དེ་ནས་བཟུང་།   བྱི་ལས་ག་དུས་ཡིན་ཡང་རང་གི་བྲུན་ས་ལ་སྦས་པ་ཡིན་ནོ། 

Translator

Translator

This is trans­lated by Loplao’s first group of trans­la­tion students.

 

Your Title Goes Here

Your con­tent goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the mod­ule Con­tent set­tings. You can also style every aspect of this con­tent in the mod­ule Design set­tings and even apply cus­tom CSS to this text in the mod­ule Advanced settings.

Submit your own translation

Related posts

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident?

What does Tibetan Culture say about the Dalai Lama Incident? 

A n optim­ist­ic indi­vidu­al like the Dalai lama would say the glob­al­ised era cre­ates an equal har­mo­ni­ous space for all cul­tures regard­less of their power dynam­ics. How­ever, the recent vir­al (edited) video of him flaunted Edward Said’s Oth­er­ness (west is nor­mal and rest…

read more
Selling Pork

Selling Pork 

Once day, after secretly killing the fat­test pig belong­ing to King of Nay­dong, Nichö Zangpo came

read more
The Cat Master

The Cat Master 

After hav­ing fooled some pigeons, the deceit­ful cat ate them. Since pigeons no longer ven­tured around him, 

read more
Tibet’s Hero

Tibet’s Hero 

Tibet is a land of her­oes and heroines. This story depicts the unwaver­ing mar­tyr­dom of a true 

read more

Get in touch and join our Mailing List!

New Field